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Lemon: How entertainment is the path to profit

At Boys+Girls, hearing someone outline of the importance of creating emotionally engaging and entertaining creative work is like preaching to the converted. But, hearing from Orlando Wood is a different ball-game. Orlando is Chief Innovation Officer at System1 Group in the UK and author of ‘Lemon’, the best selling book published by the IPA. In the book, Orlando articulates a change in advertising style that has occurred over the last 15 years and links this to falling advertising effectiveness. We’re big fans of ‘Lemon’ here in Boys+Girls, so we asked Orlando to come over to Ireland and present his research at an event we held in partnership with the Marketing Institute.

Held in the Iveagh Garden Hotel, our event was completely sold out, with even a few people texting for tickets and turning up in the hope of squeezing in. We of course let everyone in, even the eager latecomers (we’re sound like that) – the book and research is of vital important to our industry so sharing Orlando’s findings can only help the advertising industry as a whole. We kicked off with some breakfast before Pat Stephenson, Founder of Boys+Girls welcomed everyone and introduced Orlando and Aoife on stage.

Referencing the human brain and how it attends to the world, Orlando revealed how an attentional shift in the 21st Century – in society, business and advertising – has led to flatter, more abstract and devitalised work; an advertising style that is diametrically opposed to effectiveness. Illustrating how the brain attends to art, sculpture, music – and advertising – Orlando offered guidance on the type of advertising that moves and entertains audiences, and so achieves profitable growth for brands.

Orlando took us through a brief art history lesson before moving back into the advertising world to illustrate his point about the importance of leading with a right-brain approach in creating effective advertising work. Orlando’s points were further backed up by independent research into advertising effectiveness by the IPA in London.

Aoife then followed Orlando and offered five rules for creating entertaining advertising work that delivers greater commercial effectiveness for brands. Aoife took Orlando’s research and theory and added a local Irish context, showing Irish examples of creative work to illustrate her five rules. These rules were:

  1. Find the strange in the normal
  2. Don’t sell; do
  3. Find a feeling
  4. Be brand fluent
  5. Aim for happy

Pat then posed some burning questions to both Aoife and Orlando, before opening the floor for questions.

We had some great questions from the senior agency and client attendees in the room, all of whom were really impressed with Orlando’s research and Aoife’s practical guidelines.

Everyone who attended got a copy of the book ‘Lemon’ so we are hoping for lots of right-brain influenced work to start appearing in the Irish market very soon.